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Thread: Arrow Rest Reviews

  1. #1
    Super Moderator/ CTHS Supporter Fishin` Fun 2 Champion, Turtleshot Champion, chopper2 Champion, Dead Eye - Hardcore Champion, Counterstrike - Lite Champion MoodusHunter's Avatar
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    Arrow Rest Reviews

    Over the next few weeks, Stonecrusher and I will be performing gear reviews of various archery arrow rests currently on the market. Both Stonecrusher and I will review all the rests and give our independent views and opinions on the rest. Some of the rests were our own, some were loaned to us and others were given to us by manufacturers. We will determine an appropriate way on how these rests will be given to forum members. At this moment I am thinking of using the rests at the next 3D shoot event in the spring as raffle or contest prizes.

    The following criteria were used to review the various rests:

    1) Ease of Install
    2) Noise
    3) Draw/let down operation with and without shot
    4) Possible mechanical failures
    5) Adjustability
    6) Knowledge/know how needed for install and use
    7) Need for unsupplied parts
    8) Wear and tear/replacement parts
    9) Possible arrow/fletch interference
    10) Weight/size
    11) Containment
    12) Cost

    The following rests are already in our possession:
    1) Vapor Trail’s Limb Driver Arrow Rest
    2) NAP’s Quicktune 4000 Smartrest
    3) NAP’s Quicktune Sizzor
    4) Octane’s Hostage
    5) Trophy Ridge’s Deluxe Whisker Biscuit



    The following manufacturers have been contacted about participating in the review, several have committed rests for review:
    1) QAD
    2) G5 Outdoors
    3) Mid Atlantic Archery Products
    4) Ripcord
    5) Trophy Taker

  2. #2
    This will benefit me greatly. I plan on buying a bow soon.

  3. #3
    Super Moderator/ CTHS Supporter Fishin` Fun 2 Champion, Turtleshot Champion, chopper2 Champion, Dead Eye - Hardcore Champion, Counterstrike - Lite Champion MoodusHunter's Avatar
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    Deluxe Whisker Biscuit by Trophy Ridge
    By: Fran Nicklous
    http://trophyridge.com/

    This is the first of several archery arrow rests to come over the next few weeks. I contacted Trophy Ridge by phone and email however, I did not receive a response from them about reviewing their most current rest, the Sure Shot, instead; Stonecrusher and myself will be reviewing the Deluxe from 2008 model year. I’ve been shooting this rest for almost 2 years, thus I am very aware of the benefits and short comings of this rest.

    I will start with what might be considered the most important part of any new equipment, the cost. The Deluxe Whisker Biscuit costs $65, replacement whiskers cost $20 and the new 2009 Sure Shot Pro costs $110. Trophy Ridge claims that their new model is 300% stronger then the previous models, which has held up for two seasons and thousands of arrows passing through.

    The install process is rather easy with nothing more than a single bolt to attach the rest to the riser. I use a bow square to set my nock height at 3/8”, I know this is approximately where I should be based on previous rest installs. You will need two Allen wrenches to install/adjust this rest (not supplied). The largest advantage when installing a Whisker Biscuit over most drop away type rests is that there is no need for tying or serving any strings into the bow cables. Once attached, the rest is ready to paper tune. The arrow rest is on the light side and does not require a large amount of space on the riser to install.

    Paper tuning a Whisker Biscuit can be a bit of a problem at times because of the fletching contact every shot. Paper tuning is one of those techniques that is heavily debated. Some people do not paper tune, others shoot from 6’ away from the paper while others yet shoot from inches away. I paper tune every rest typically from a 6’-8’ distance, this seams to be what the majority of most archers state they do. The Whisker Biscuit has set screws for adjusting the vertical and left/right center shot. Both adjustments are marked with ticks to help in adjusting the rest a small but noticeable amount whenever needed. Over the 2 years of shooting this rest, and making adjustments on a continuing basis, I have partially stripped the left/right adjustment. Luckily I was going to replace the rest after this season anyways.

    The Whisker Biscuit is a 100% full containment arrow rest and short of pulling the arrow out with your hands; there is no way the arrow will fall out even with the most violent of draws or let downs. Shooting the Whisker Biscuit is quite. There are no moving parts and thus almost no noise is present. There is, however, a possibility of noise during extreme weather when the arrow shaft slides over whiskers which may be frozen (happened to me last year in January). Other then the acclimate weather, the only noise is a quite sound when the fletching pass through the whiskers.

    The Whisker Biscuit will require at a minimum the whiskers be replaced every season to be safe. The whiskers making contact every shot on the fletches of the arrow creates the need to repair the fletches when they become wavey. There are methods of applying heat to the fletch from a lighter or hair dryer that will straighten the fletches back out but eventually the fletching will have to be replaced. Another downside to the Whisker Biscuit is a disruption to the arrow flight when leaving the bow because of the contact on the arrow 100% of shots. There are two different colored whiskers on the rest brown and black. Brown is for the fletching to pass through where black is for the arrow to rest on. The difference is that black are a stiffer material. If the fletching were to spin and pass through the black whiskers, there would be even more arrow flight disruption.

    I would recomend this rest for the novice archer and the spot and stalk hunter. For those that want extreme flexibilty, control and consistent shooting with their equipment, I would recomend a drop away rest, after 2 years of shooting the Whisker Biscuit I will be switching to a drop away. Next rest review will be for the Vapor Trail Limb Driver arrow rest.
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  4. #4
    Super Moderator/CTHS Supporter Space Invaders Champion, Breakout Champion, Turbocharged Penguins! Champion StoneCrusher's Avatar
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    I removed my rest, installed the Wisker Biscut today, paper-tuned, and took shots at 10 yrds and 20 yrds. (my bow is featured in the thumbnails above). Since Moodus has been shooting this for quite some time, I will just comment directly to the criteria categories.

    1) Ease of Install - there is no easier rest to install. One bolt for install. Had it paper-tuned with 3 shots.
    2) Noise - Since the arrow is fully entraped by "whiskers" there is no chance of the arrow shaft bumping into the bow causing noise. There is noticeable noise when drawing the arrow back as it is brushing against the arrow shaft. Not sure that this is significant at 20 yrds, but it may be heard by a deer in very close range.
    3) Draw/let down operation with and without shot - no issues with draw/let-down operation.
    4) Possible mechanical failures - I can't not see that this unit will have mechanical failures. There are no moving parts and the machining of the unit is well done.
    5) Adjustability Adjustability was quick and easy. simple allen wrench design give you full range of up/down and right/left motion.
    6) Knowledge/know how needed for install and use -you don't even know how to walk upright to have the mechanical know-how to install this rest.
    7) Need for unsupplied parts - Moodus suplied the rest, and there did not appear to be anything else required.
    8) Wear and tear/replacement parts - There is evidence that this design does wear over time which will have a direct impact on needing sight adjustments as it wears. I don't know how many arrows have been shot with this rest, but I would say that it is in need of a new set of whiskers. Replacement parts are available everywhere; from Walmart, Dick's, cabelas, or online at low cost.
    9) Possible arrow/fletch interference - This is probably the only negative catagory for this rest. Since the arrow and vanes come into contact with the rest, I would guess that the arrow speed is slightly compromized (I did not chrono to see what the difference is, but it has been agreed upon by the manufacturere that it slows the arrow down about 1.2% (3 ft/sec @ 280 ft/sec). Also, this interference appeared to influence my groupings to be about 3" at 20yrds (granted I was shooting in the rain) This is still very respectful for deer hunting. Although this is just a theory, If you are hunting in sleeting weather (should be home anyway), ice could build up on the whiskers whereby ruining an accurate shot.
    10) Weight/size In comparison to others, it is probably slightly lighter than most.
    11) Containment - GREAT! makes for spot and stalk hunting worry free. no chance of the arrow moving or falling offf the rest. ***you need to make sure that you purchase the correct whiskerbiscut hole size to match your arrow shaft size. With the arrow installed there should be .030" of clearance at the top of the arrow shaft.
    12) Cost The cost is very resonable for the Deluxe, although they do sell a higher cost model

    Final Comment: For hunting, this is definately a good rest for the money. I would recommend this to all new archery hunters becuase set-up is easy, fairly quiet operation, and no moving mechanical parts. If you are only going to target shoot, you may want to look for a different rest as there is no need to fully capture the arrow.

  5. #5
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    Great review! I've been using the same whisker biscuit for six years now with no problems. I shoot quite a bit and the thing doesn't seem to wear out. Maybe it's because I shoot feathers. It does wear the feathers out.They are pretty raged by the end of the season.

  6. #6
    Super Moderator/ CTHS Supporter Fishin` Fun 2 Champion, Turtleshot Champion, chopper2 Champion, Dead Eye - Hardcore Champion, Counterstrike - Lite Champion MoodusHunter's Avatar
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    Vapor Trail Limb Driver

    Limb Driver Arrow Rest by Vapor Trail
    By: Fran Nicklous
    http://www.vaportrailarchery.com/

    This is the second arrow rest for the CTHnS’ comprehensive arrow rest review. The Limb Driver is the first drop away to be discussed but it differs from most drop aways in one key element, the manner in which the rest drops; to be discussed in detail later. The Limb Driver was the first drop away arrow rest that I have shot, as mentioned in a previous review I have been shooting a Whisker Biscuit for the last 2 seasons. Stonecrusher’s review will soon follow mine.

    As always, I will start with the most important part of the review, the cost of the rest. The Limb Driver Arrow Rest is $99-$114 depending on color (camo is more expensive, but the rest comes in several colors including black for the ground blind hunters). There is one model for all bows, there is however, a free when asked for split limb limb driver for quad limbed bows. As previously mentioned Vapor Trail’s design differs from most of the current industry’s approach to dropping the rest. Most drop-away arrow rests on the market rely on a spring and gravity to drop the rest out of the flight path of the arrow. Vapor Trail uses gravity along with a cable that is attached to the upper limb(s) of the bow eliminates timing issues caused when strings are served into the bus cable. This also only puts strain on the spring when in the up position instead of constant pressure found in most drop-aways. Vapor Trail states the Limb Driver has 70% arrow shaft cycle support providing full fletching clearance. The rest has the ability to be shot as a stationary rest if desired or needed for mechanical reasons. This would result in fletching contact.

    The Limb Driver is most likely the easiest drop-away arrow rest on the market to install. The only need is for Allen wrenches, four different sizes in fact (not provided). There is no need for serving the string into the downward moving bus cable. This rest is as easy to install as the Whisker Biscuit. There is a 14 minute instructional video on the website showing the proper install. Once the rest is attached to the riser and the limb river to the upper limbs, the next step is to run the string from the limb driver through the rest and pull upward tightening the string set screw. There is a spring adjustment screw used to adjust the drop speed if desired, my bow shoots at 230 fps which is slower then most newer bows and did not require adjustment for drop speed. The rest comes with a rubber arrow holder that is placed on the arrow shelf. The holder contains the arrow while the bow is not in use (i.e. hanging on a tree hook) and for all but the last few inches of the draw cycle. The rest is now ready to be paper tuned.

    Paper tuning did not take long. The left right adjustment was done with three shots but up down took almost a dozen shots. The main problem I have is with adjusting the up/down center shot, because of the string always having tension the tendency is for the center shot to be pulled up once the set screw is loosened. The good news is that both left/right and up/down have increment markings to determine where the rest was set before adjusting.

    After paper tuning I decided to shoot and sight in with the new rest. The first thing I noticed was the draw cycle, the draw cycle is very smooth raising the rest during the last 3-5” of the draw cycle at the same time removing the arrow from the rubber holder. The up/down location of the arrow rest for my set-up was low causing the prongs to contact the arrow shelf when dropping, I placed felt on the arrow shelf and that noise was eliminated. There was no noticeable arrow bounce during the draw cycle but on let down there is substantial arrow movement often times causing the arrow to contact the arrow shelf thus making noticeable noise, there is 0 containment when an arrow is let down. My first several draw cycles resulted in a screeching noise from the arrow rubbing on the metal prongs covered with heat shrink tubing. I decided to cover the prongs with some felt to eliminate this noise.

    Possible mechanical failures would include the spring breaking however, it appears to be well concealed and not reachable from the outside of the rest easily. The string attached between the limb and the rest could break resulting in the rest being always in the up position. A back up string is about $2 and is nothing more then D-Loop material. I already carry spare D-loop material so nothing new for me. The string is taught while not a full draw resulting in an easy to cut with a broad head if the hunter is not paying attention (then again the same goes for your bow string and cable which would be a much larger problem). The heat shrink tubing on the prongs (or the felt in my case) will wear out overtime and need to be replaced. This appears to be a common theme in almost all arrow rests needing some replacement part(s) from normal wear and tear. The rubber arrow holder will wear out overtime resulting in a loose arrow when the bow is not at full draw. The arrow rest is light and does not add significant weight to the bow, the only out of the ordinary addition is the limb driver attached to the upper limb.

    My opinion is that this rest is a very well made rest and has great appeal because of the ingenuity used in the dropping action. After shooting the rest for one hour I was confident enough to bring the rest into the woods with me for a hunt. I didn’t take any shots or even draw the bow for that matter but the bow hung on my tree hook with an arrow in the rubber holder the entire time without a problem. After shooting this drop-away rest I have decided that I will not shoot the Whisker Biscuit or any other contact style arrow rest again. My groups shrunk by 50% with my 20 yard groups fitting in a 1” diameter circle. The second added benefit was that when I switched over to broad head tune I didn’t have to adjust a single thing. I’m not sure if this is the rest I’m going to end up choosing, I would prefer to have more containment on let down, but in the mean time the rest is heading back to the manufacturer (it was a loaner).
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  7. #7
    Super Moderator/CTHS Supporter Space Invaders Champion, Breakout Champion, Turbocharged Penguins! Champion StoneCrusher's Avatar
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    Starting the process again, I removed the whisker Biscuit rest and installed The Limb Driver rest, paper-tuned, and took shots at 10 yrds and 20 yrds. (Moodus's bow is featured in the thumbnails above).
    1) Ease of Install - The install is really very easy. It was so simple in fact that I didn't need to watch the manufacturer's instructional video to perform the installation. I did watch the video after shooting and it did provide explanations on drop-away timing and also provides a high frame rate video loop that displays the rest dropping away as the arrow is released. There is one bolt required for the rest itself, and then an additional cord that is attached to the release on one end and to the bow limb on the other end of the cord.
    2) Noise – There was some noise associated with the operation on my bow. The release forks would contact the bowshelf with a fair amount of force. I think with additional adjustments, I could have minimized the noise to an unnoticeable level. There was also noise generated when drawing the arrow back because the arrow shaft was in contact with the metal release forks. Once again, this is easily cured by applying some mole-skin over the release forks.
    3) Draw/let down operation with and without shot - The release does come with a small rubber arrow holder which sticks on and holds the arrow in the bow shelf prior to drawing your bow. The only issue is a let-down. If you let-down you bow, the arrow will no longer be contained and leaves you at risk of the arrow shaft falling to the side and striking the bow, or worse yet, falling off completely. The rubber arrow holder I tested did not stick well to my bow (Moodus took all the ‘sticky’ off of it), so I decided to not use it in this test. Apart from that, the rest raised and lowered the arrow very smoothly.
    4) Possible mechanical failures – There are a few possible mechanical failures. Like on my installation, if you allow the release forks to contact the bow shelf with force, you could damage the fork operation or possibly bend the forks over time. There is risk of failure of the release cord also. My Martin Moab is equipped with a roller cable guard (many bows have the typical slide cable guard). This guard would contact the release cord throughout most of the operation of bow draw. Some adjustments were made to alleviate this, but would have required more work and adjustments.
    5) Adjustability - This rest has the basic features required to properly adjust the rest, but there is one known issue with adjustability. This issue is within the spring tension that is applied to the forks. It is hard for me to explain, but when you adjust the spring tension there is an Allen set screw that you must first loosen. You rotate the release shaft to increase or decrease this spring tension. When tightening the setscrew you must squeeze the assembly together with your fingers. Not doing so will make the assembly loose allowing it to ‘walk’ left and right when shooting which will have a huge impact on your windage settings. Squeezing to tightly will invoke friction between the stationary and rotating parts and that will result in delayed/or no operation of the forks. Careful initial set-up is required if adjusting spring tension.
    6) Knowledge/know how needed for install and use –This rest does require more know-how to install properly than basic containment rests, but it can be done by the do-it yourselfer.
    7) Need for unsupplied parts – The rest does come with mole-skin, but depending on the installation, you may need more. Also, the rest requires 4 different sized Allen wrenches that do not come with the rest. (Actually, I prefer that manufacturers don’t waste money putting standard tools in with the purchased item as they are usually poor quality leaving me with using my own tools anyway).
    8) Wear and tear/replacement parts – There are not a lot of parts that would wear out. You have the cord which is available anywhere bows are sold (Dick’s, Cabelas, …) The spring could fail, or eventually shows signs of spring rate change. There are also, what look to be, plastic washers that could wear. Although I did not contact the company, they do offer a 1-800 number and are open 9-5 on most days if you need replacement parts.
    9) Possible arrow/fletch interference – As the name implies “drop-away” there should be no contact with the arrow shaft or fletching. If there is, you probably don’t have the rest adjusted/installed correctly or there was a failure.
    10) Weight/size – I would have to say this is probably the lightest drop-away rest I have seen and this is due to the primitive adjustments and thin forks.
    11) Containment – None, except prior to first draw.
    12) Cost The cost is comparable to other drop away rests, but I think it should be in the $60-$80 price range due to its simplicity and adjustability constraints.

    Final Comment: I had never shot a drop-away rest before. On the upside, It did tighten my groups up considerably. So much so, that I can no longer aim for the same spot on the 20 yrd target. I know I would be breaking arrows as I believe that I could be easily holding <1” groups at 20 yrds. On the downside, I think this rest is slightly too high of a cost and does not offer full containment.

  8. #8
    2011 CTHS Supporter buckwild's Avatar
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    G5

    I have the G5 drop away rest. Started using it last year and love it. I still am a fan of the wisker bisquet but This one is sweet.

  9. #9
    Super Moderator/ CTHS Supporter Fishin` Fun 2 Champion, Turtleshot Champion, chopper2 Champion, Dead Eye - Hardcore Champion, Counterstrike - Lite Champion MoodusHunter's Avatar
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    I've spoken with G5 and they had commited to sending a rest but I still have not received one, going on 3-4 weeks now. I'll have to give them another call.

  10. #10
    Good job guys!! I look forward to reading more. As you may remember from the BBQ my stuff is pretty dated. I was thinking about opening the wallet(finally) and maybe updating and I'm always open to opinions of those with the knowledge I know you possess.

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