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Thread: Bow questions

  1. #11
    CTHS Supporter passinthru63's Avatar
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    I've been archery hunting since I was 12, 32 years now and I still use the pro shop. Not all the time, but I use them.

    Arrow selection is very important for your bow to shoot safely and accurately. You also mention 60# and 70# well you just added another dimension into it - changing your draw weight. If you haven't picked an arrow that allows the draw weight range you mentioned with the head weight you have determined, you may need new arrows as you adjust your draw weight.

    Using an arrow selection chart like this one will help
    Easton Arrow Selection chart

    Arrow selection is super important because you have to remember that the bow must transfer it's energy into the arrow. The arrow must be matched to the bow's draw weight, head weight, shooting style, etc. Arrows have what is called Spine - basically the amount of felxibility in the arrow. Get an arrow that is not stiff enough and damage to the bow or yourself is possible.

    This is a great site to understand how an arrow works and what happens when it is shot from a bow.
    Archery, Arrows & Arrow Flight

    Want to see a cool video of arrows leaving a bow in slow motion that will blow your mind. Check it out
    Slow motion video of arro leaving the bow

    I have a video of many different clips of arrows leaving the bow - the one above is on the video I have and I always show this in my Bowhunter Educations courses and it is amazing at how many WOWS I hear when I play it, even from those fathers that have bowhunted for years.


    The pro shop will definitely let you try out equipment before purchasing. My last bow purchase 3 years ago I spent 4 hours at Halls Arrow shooting bows and it came down to 3 bows and I still shot all 3 for another hour to really get what fit me the best as all 3 were tack drivers and met my goals.

    If your equipment doesn't fit, you will get super frustrated. A compound bow is much different than a recurve - not sure how you had your recurve setup but in simple terms there may have been no rest and even no sights. Now you are dealing with way more mechanical stuff that can start affecting your shooting.

    Hit the pro shop and ask for help and pay attention to what they are doing and ask questions so you can learn and do yourself.

    As far as drop away versus whisker biscut for hunting - all depends on your skills and confidence in mechanical things, same as making a decision on mechanical broadheads. Remember the rule - KISS - Keep It Simple Stupid I still live by this with my archery equipment. When you are on a week long bowhunt and something starts to fail, you don't want to waste tons of time getting back up and running. The whisker biscuit will definitely old your arrow tightly in place and doesn't seem to affect flight at all. Many drop away rests also have some type of arrow holder built in as well but once you start to draw the holder is usually released now if you don't shoot or have to let down what happens now??? Those are the things you should be looking at and thinking about.

    Best of luck and welcome back to bowhunting.


  2. #12
    Oldfarmsblueman
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    I will add my 2 cents.There is more to the bow than many people
    think.Many things will come up and change as you lurn.First as stated
    you need to find a place to start.When I started looking I had know
    idea of what I needed.I went around picking up many differant bows
    and you soon find what feels good and what is not.Next you need to
    find your draw lanth.At Cabala's they said I was a 27.5 draw.At Columbia
    sport they recommended 26".I wanted a bow that I could handle.I went
    with a 40-50 pound pull.For six months I shot around 43#.You get stronger
    as you shoot.It took a year to reach 50+#.Once you get started
    you will find things that you might change.The shop can only do so
    much.They can get you started but you will need to lurn many things
    about setting the tune on the bow.Then you might play around with
    sights,arrow rests,peep sights, arrows,releases,string loops and stabilizers.
    Are you shooting with a quiver on of off the bow?Many people just
    shoot and don't realize that things change.A bow string will stretch and
    they ALL do.That will change how it shoots.Different GPI arrows and
    different field points feathers,vanes blazers all make a difference.Then
    when your all set you start shooting broadheads.Most broadheads do
    not fly like field points.You will need a good target to practice if you
    can shoot at home.Then a broadhead target before hunting season.I do
    most of my practicing sitting and from a tree stand.The first year I
    discovered you use differant muscles sitting than standing.I try and do
    both.I play around with different arrows that I cut and fletch myself.
    If you can pick up a good book and lurn as you go.Once I started I can't
    stop.

  3. #13
    Cal45
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    Quote Originally Posted by deadfish View Post
    Okay...but I was under the impression that different draw weights required different broadhead weight for proper arrow flight...(or is it the shaft weight that makes the most difference)

    By the way...this is great stuff...thanks to all! I really appreciate your time and input!

    Rick
    Getting into some technical stuff there. Probably the most important things in good arrow flight is foward of center. You want probably around 10%. That means that the balance point is about 10% of the distance from the center of the arrow towards the front. As long as you have some FOC it dosen't matter what grain point you shoot. You also need to be sure you have the correct arrow for your draw weight and length. Under or over spined will give you poor performance.

  4. #14
    Forkhorn
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    I've been shooting for 35 years and i will go as far as putting hardware on my bow but when it comes to set up go to a pro shop, because after the bow is set up you are going to have to paper shoot it.Bill at columbia is great. a few things that i will never let cost get in the way of is a good release, i use a Scott, a good sight, a good arrow rest and good broad heads, i use 100gr rocky fixed blades. These are all pro-shop or i use Bass pro or Cabelas. You might also want to order an extra string before deer season, one nick from a broad head and your done. alot of the things involved in settin up a bow requires a bow press, a bow stand, a weight scale, a leveler for you knocks to arrow rest position and even though i own all of these i still go to Bill at Columbia. Good Luck.....

  5. #15
    14 pointer Jimfire85's Avatar
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    I Second heading to a pro shop. I too thought I could handle it myself until after a few trips to halls and the young man there by the name of mike spoke up with some advice. I had my bow tuned specifically to my needs and with a few adjustments to my pin I was keeping less than 2" groups with ease. I know it can be daunting to ask for pro help, but when you do it can only make you a better archer.

    Also for my two cents on broadheads, I use trophy ridge mechanicals, I believe they changed the name to "meat seekers" this past year.
    Last edited by Jimfire85; 02-14-2010 at 06:56 AM. Reason: spelling errors

  6. #16
    Well since I'm not ready to invest in all the neccesary tools (yet), I will take your advice and go to Center Sports for a tune. I still need to purchase a release anyway...the one I have now is an older style "T" handle with a thumb trigger.

    Thanks again Guys

  7. #17
    CTHS Moderator Spotted Crow's Avatar
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    I would totaly agree with 12 Ring. Go to the shop at least once, You'll be going there more often anyway to get more and MORE! It's like pringles once you pop you can't stop! Let them set the bow to you, and watch you shoot a few, no one can see you better then someone else! The bow itself is easy to set up, just alot of little things! Like you said everything is the best. Find what YOU like! Bill at Center is great. Gary at Andover is also great. Both I believe Olympic shooters So... The guys at Halls, I dont know to much about, but I bought my PSE BowMadness xs there! But do yourself a favor, go to a shop! you will be glad you did! Good luck and enjoy the mystical flight of the red snowcone shaft of life!

  8. #18
    I've only been bowhunting 3 seasons so i'm no expert. Couple things i'd add if you've never shot before: bend your front elbow just slightly or you'll get a nice welt on your forearm when the string hits it. I like to keep my front hand open when i shoot to avoid twisting the bow. Shoot from different angles not just straight on. Don't think anyone does anymore, but don't shoot aluminum arrows. Miss one time and they're garbage.

    Here's the simplest cheapest thing that really helped me out.
    I went to a guy with a very small shop in danbury that did this for me. I already had a kisser on the bow. He had me draw back and he put one of those little brass clamps on my bowsting right where it touched my nose. Now when i draw back i've got two anchor points go off. I got alot more consistent with that simple thing.

  9. #19
    Quote Originally Posted by DaveinCT View Post
    I've only been bowhunting 3 seasons so i'm no expert. Couple things i'd add if you've never shot before: bend your front elbow just slightly or you'll get a nice welt on your forearm when the string hits it. I like to keep my front hand open when i shoot to avoid twisting the bow. Shoot from different angles not just straight on. Don't think anyone does anymore, but don't shoot aluminum arrows. Miss one time and they're garbage.

    Here's the simplest cheapest thing that really helped me out.
    I went to a guy with a very small shop in danbury that did this for me. I already had a kisser on the bow. He had me draw back and he put one of those little brass clamps on my bowsting right where it touched my nose. Now when i draw back i've got two anchor points go off. I got alot more consistent with that simple thing.
    This is an old thread but thanks for chiming in...I alway appreciate any and all help.
    I know all about the welt thing...used to have a recurve when I ws a kid and bought an armguard for the compound (don't even want to know what string slap from this thing would be like!)
    I like your idea about the kisser point. Right now I've decided to go with that instead of a peep..don't like looking through the peep at all...Been using my thumbnail to my lower ear lobe as an anchor while practising, but I'm sure I don't always have my thumb "exactly" in the same spot each draw...at least that's what I've been thinking when I had blown what seemed to be perfectly controlled draws and shots. Thanks for the idea...I will put it to use right away!

    Rick C.

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