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Thread: Where to start?

  1. #1

    Where to start?

    I am very new to hunting. I would like to scout for deer, but really have no clue where to start. I have to hunt on public land, but I can't find any decent public land near me that isn't flat forest without field, breaks, etc. I'm in the New Haven area. Thanks for any help!

  2. #2
    CTHS Supportor Horizontal Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sellersrobe View Post
    I am very new to hunting. I would like to scout for deer, but really have no clue where to start. I have to hunt on public land, but I can't find any decent public land near me that isn't flat forest without field, breaks, etc. I'm in the New Haven area. Thanks for any help!
    The first order of business is to get the required hunter ed classes out of the way so you can get the licenses for the type of hunting you want to do.

    Then you have to find the deer. You can't hunt what isn't there. Patterns change as the seasons change and food sources change. The only way to find them is to get out there and burn some boot leather. The state has a good resource for locating public lands. I included the link below.

    http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?...epNav_GID=1633

    One of the best things you can do is to partner up with an experienced hunter and you can learn the basics from them. It will greatly speed up the learning curve.

    Bob
    Vegetarian: vejiˈte(ə)rēən/noun: old Indian word for lousy hunter.
    Excalibur Exocet, GT Laser II, 2" Bhoning Blazers 125g NAP Spitfire

  3. #3
    Quote Originally Posted by Horizontal Hunter View Post
    The first order of business is to get the required hunter ed classes out of the way so you can get the licenses for the type of hunting you want to do.

    Then you have to find the deer. You can't hunt what isn't there. Patterns change as the seasons change and food sources change. The only way to find them is to get out there and burn some boot leather. The state has a good resource for locating public lands. I included the link below.

    http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?...epNav_GID=1633

    One of the best things you can do is to partner up with an experienced hunter and you can learn the basics from them. It will greatly speed up the learning curve.

    Bob
    Thanks! I am taking my bowhunt course soon. I was thinking about checking out the Cockaponset forest in Guilford, but it seemed like straight forest, no fields or anything.

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    CTHS Supportor Horizontal Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Sellersrobe View Post
    Thanks! I am taking my bowhunt course soon. I was thinking about checking out the Cockaponset forest in Guilford, but it seemed like straight forest, no fields or anything.
    It can be very difficult to get into hunter ed courses so don't put it off if you aren't signed up yet. There is a separate course in CT to gun hunt if that is something you are interested.

    Anywhere there is good bedding and food there will be deer. They are "creatures of the edge" so you want to look for transitions. Not just the field/forest edge. There are many other edges to consider. Swamps, bogs, mountain laurel etc.

    Find the current food source, find the bedding, and walk the transitions.

    Read, read, read... walk, walk, walk.


    Bob
    Vegetarian: vejiˈte(ə)rēən/noun: old Indian word for lousy hunter.
    Excalibur Exocet, GT Laser II, 2" Bhoning Blazers 125g NAP Spitfire

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    Super Moderator Deadeye Logun S16 Champion, Backyard Shootout Champion TooManyHobbies's Avatar
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    Many of us hunting "straight" forest. Find the contours, streams, ponds, swampy areas, oaks (food). Stone walls can funnel deer, as can even the slightest Hill or valley. Wear out some boots and find trails and old rubs on trees. Find the thickest growth you can (bedding). Keep notes or GPS of what you find and put it all together on a map. After a couple years, you will be able to just look at a forest and know where to find deer.
    Good luck.
    NOBODY EVER SHOT BAMBI....they shot his momma.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Horizontal Hunter View Post
    It can be very difficult to get into hunter ed courses so don't put it off if you aren't signed up yet. There is a separate course in CT to gun hunt if that is something you are interested.

    Anywhere there is good bedding and food there will be deer. They are "creatures of the edge" so you want to look for transitions. Not just the field/forest edge. There are many other edges to consider. Swamps, bogs, mountain laurel etc.

    Find the current food source, find the bedding, and walk the transitions.

    Read, read, read... walk, walk, walk.


    Bob
    Just a minor correction. To buy a hunting license of any type you need to have completed the CT DEEP conservation course.

    "No hunting or trapping licenses will be issued to any person unless proof is provided that they have held a RESIDENT license in the respective sport within the last 5 years OR the person has a certificate indicating successful completion of a Connecticut Conservation Education/Firearms Safety (CE/FS) course (or recognized equivalent) in the respective sport for which they are applying."

    If you want to bow hunt then you need to complete the archery course. This is in addition to the CE/FS course.

    "Must show proof of completion of the CE/FS bowhunting course (since 1982) or its equivalent from another state or country when purchasing a small game/deer archery permit."

    All the information can be accessed here:

    http://www.ct.gov/deep/cwp/view.asp?...epNav_GID=1633

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    CTHS Supportor Horizontal Hunter's Avatar
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    Interesting.

    When I started bow hunting Connecticut as a non-resident all I needed was the bowhuntng course. A few years later when I wanted to gun hunt I just needed my hunter safety course. This was all ten years ago or so.

    Thanks for the update.

    Bob
    Vegetarian: vejiˈte(ə)rēən/noun: old Indian word for lousy hunter.
    Excalibur Exocet, GT Laser II, 2" Bhoning Blazers 125g NAP Spitfire

  8. #8
    2011 CTHS Supporter CT-Hunter's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Horizontal Hunter View Post
    Interesting.

    When I started bow hunting Connecticut as a non-resident all I needed was the bowhuntng course. A few years later when I wanted to gun hunt I just needed my hunter safety course. This was all ten years ago or so.

    Thanks for the update.

    Bob
    Non-resident licenses are handed differently. As a resident, I get my basic license and any deer etc. permits through the same system. We have to do something to justify the extra cost. It may have something to do with the implementation of the online system and the assignment of a conservation ID (permanent license number).
    From the DEEP website:

    https://ct.aspirafocus.com/InternetSales/Home/FAQ#FAQ12


    Iím a Non-Resident, how do I obtain my Fishing, Firearmís Hunting or Archery Permit in the State of Connecticut?
    • For an Inland, Marine or Combination fishing license you can register for a Conservation ID# and purchase your license. If you have purchased one in the past few years, please use your existing Conservation ID# to access your account.
    • To purchase a Non- Resident Firearmís Hunting license for the first time in CT, you will have to show proof of a Hunter Education Certificate or a copy of a RESIDENT hunting license valid within the last 5 years. You can do this at any license agent location.
    • To purchase a Non-Resident Archery Permit for the first time in CT, you will have to show proof of a Bow Hunter Education Certificate. You can do this at any license agent location.
    • If you would like to purchase the Non-Resident Firearmís License or Archery Permit online, please call our office at 860-424-3105 and we will instruct you on how to do so.

  9. #9
    Quote Originally Posted by Horizontal Hunter View Post
    It can be very difficult to get into hunter ed courses so don't put it off if you aren't signed up yet. There is a separate course in CT to gun hunt if that is something you are interested.

    Anywhere there is good bedding and food there will be deer. They are "creatures of the edge" so you want to look for transitions. Not just the field/forest edge. There are many other edges to consider. Swamps, bogs, mountain laurel etc.

    Find the current food source, find the bedding, and walk the transitions.



    Read, read, read... walk, walk, walk.


    Bob
    Also look for stands of trees. One of the most obvious deer areas I found was an 'edge' where a large pine stand bordered a large oak stand.

    As others have mentioned read, read, read, and walk, walk, walk. But walk slow and be observant w/ eyes and ears. You'll see really cool things. Some of the coolest I've seen: a spider building her web in the early morning, fox kits that had no clue I was there, birds landing next to me on the tree trunk or on my knocked arrow, having a buck 15yds from me while on the ground and not picking me off.

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