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Thread: New to duck hunting

  1. #1

    New to duck hunting

    So I've been trying to figure out where and how to duck hunt and it's not going well I've been deer hunting for 15 years and pheasant hunting for 4 i have 2 labs 5 years and 8months both are phenomenal pheasant hunters. I live in colchester and would love to go out and learn to duck hunt if somone wants to teach a new guy im more than willing to learn. If this sounds like something you'd be willing to to please pm me or email me at Btscholz@hotmail.com thanks


  2. #2
    Super Moderator Deadeye Logun S16 Champion, Backyard Shootout Champion TooManyHobbies's Avatar
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    Welcome aboard bitsy. Duck hunting isn't all that hard. Find huntable water, toss in some dekes and quack in series of five or so, listen to what the ducks do and copy it. Camo up well. It's trial and error, but I've decoyed ducks with 2 liter soda bottles painted brown. ( I was young and broke). Put those dogs to work. Good luck.
    Last edited by TooManyHobbies; 11-07-2017 at 07:39 PM.
    NOBODY EVER SHOT BAMBI....they shot his momma.

  3. #3
    14 pointer Du Ct's Avatar
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    New to duck hunting

    $$$$h$$&jjjj&
    Last edited by Du Ct; 11-07-2017 at 09:18 PM.
    "When it comes your time to die, sing your death song and die like a hero going home." Tecumseh

  4. #4
    12 Point
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    I'm far from an avid duck hunter but two things i have used to find my prize hunting spots are Google Earth, and my eyes. I would see ducks flying low at sunset in certain areas then look at maps to see where they might be coming from, then do some scouting or investigating. Look for swamps around major rivers, or look for areas than may have flood waters due to beaver dams

    Good luck and let us know how you do

  5. #5
    14 pointer WoodsmanA's Avatar
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    I've been waterfowling for seven years now, successfully for about five years, though I still consider myself a greenhorn. Some may say I have an obsession... I call it a passion. I too came from a deer and turkey hunting background when the fowl bug bit me. I did everything wrong at first but over those first couple years I learned a ton from my mistakes. I was then fortunate enough to partner up with a local waterfowler and he helped guide me. It does definitely help to meet someone who can teach you and thing or two. But if you're going into it without the helping hand of an experienced waterfowler, the best thing you can do is put boots on the ground and search for spots to hunt. There are many excellent state spots available to hunt ducks and geese. However, in my experience it all comes down to spending time on the road to knock on doors to gain access to private swamps and ponds and fields. And once you gain access to a private spot, whether it be a swamp for ducks or a corn field for geese, that doesn't mean a damn thing if the birds don't want to be there. So the next step, especially if you're looking for consistency and most definitely if you want to come away with at least some meat after each hunt, is scouting. Not just drive by scouting. Not afternoon scouting one time during the summer. True scouting, close to season openers, as if you were about hunt the spot. Paddle in before sun rise and wait in the reeds. Sit a roost spot until 30 minutes after dark. See what's actually happening. Find the X, the spot where the birds want to be. If there are no birds there, don't hunt the spot. One thing I've seen quite a few people do is hunt a spot because, "It looks ducky." I also hear a lot, "I saw some mallards at this spot last year so I'm going to throw out some decoys tomorrow." That's why guys come home without birds and get discouraged. It also helps a ton to read through the infinite number of resources that are publicly available online. Read about mallard habits. Read about a day in the life of a wood duck. Each of these ducks have different habitat preferences and food sources. They each have their own reasons for being in one spot over the next. The migration is different for all species too. Timing the arrival of a specific species of birds can be very difficult but if you learn a little bit about the bird you want to hunt, things become easier over the year. Especially as you add experiences under your belt. As far as patterning birds, starting with local ducks next year (for the October season) may be a little bit easier to start. But that doesn't mean you shouldn't get out there now for the migration. So my best advice is to knock on private or search for some state swamps. Spend a little time scouting. And then give it a go. All this said, it is common to not come home with birds in the bag even after you've done all this pre season and pre hunt work. But don't ever get doscouraged. Whether you see birds or not, every hunt you'll learn something new. Get out there. Good luck.
    Licensed Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator
    www.PAWServicesCT.com

  6. #6
    Good advice woodsman. As Fred Bear said, hunt where the deer (ducks) are, not where you think they should be

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