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Thread: DEEP reports small die-off in Middletown-area white-tailed deer herd

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    DEEP reports small die-off in Middletown-area white-tailed deer herd

    HARTFORD — Since early September, the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection Wildlife Division has documented more than 50 white-tailed deer exhibiting symptoms associated with Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease primarily in the towns of Middletown and Portland, with a few in Chester, Haddam and Lyme, according to a press release.
    EHDV-6 is transmitted to deer by tiny biting flies (midges). Although the virus has also been detected in other mammals, including mule deer, elk and domestic cattle, white-tailed deer represent 95 percent of the affected animals, according to the DEEP. Once infected, the disease progresses rapidly, with deer exhibiting symptoms that include a swollen head, neck, tongue or eyelids with a bloody discharge from the nasal cavity; ulcers on the tongue; and hemorrhaging of the heart and lungs followed by death within three to five days
    The virus also creates high feverish conditions, causing infected deer to sometimes be found in or near water sources.
    Concern over hemorrhagic disease should not limit hunter willingness to harvest deer during the hunting season, the release continues. The disease does not infect humans, and people are not at risk by eating venison from or handling infected deer, or by being bitten by infected midges.

    The disease rarely causes illness in domestic animals, such as cattle, sheep, goats, horses, dogs and cats. However, hunters should exercise caution if they observe a deer that is behaving abnormally or appears sick, and avoid shooting, handling or consuming that animal. When field dressing deer, hunters should wear latex or rubber gloves and disinfect any instruments that come in contact with the animal, the DEEP advises.


    The DEEP Wildlife Division first learned of several dead deer in the Portland/Middletown area from a hunter. The deer were in various stages of decay, with some lying along the river bank, while others were floating in the water. On Oct. 15, the DEEP received confirmation from the Southeastern Cooperative Wildlife Disease Study group that a deer from Middletown tested positive for Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease Virus 6.
    Prior to 2004, only two subtypes of Hemorrhagic Disease were documented in North America. EHDV-6 was first detected in 2006 in Indiana and Illinois, and has since been reported throughout the Midwest, and from Florida, North Carolina and Maryland, the DEEP reports.

    Read More:
    http://www.middletownpress.com/middl...a-12304975.php
    Vegetarian: vejiˈte(ə)rēən/noun: old Indian word for lousy hunter.
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    That's spooky ****!

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    Aggressive Ebola-Like Virus Killing Deer In Connecticut

    An invasive and usually fatal disease for white-tailed deer has been identified in Connecticut for the first time, state officials report, with more than 50 deer in Portland, Middletown and nearby communities showing symptoms of the virus.
    The “Epizootic Hemorrhagic Disease (EHDV-6)” isn’t dangerous to humans, but the decomposing bodies of several deer killed by the virus have been found lying along the banks of the Connecticut River since September.


    “This is the first time we’ve had a large-scale die-off and confirmation of this hemorrhagic disease in Connecticut,” Andy Labonte, a wildlife biologist with the Department of Energy and Environmental Protection, said Wednesday.
    “This disease kills them pretty quickly,” Labonte said, usually within three to five days.



    A better-known type of hemorrhagic fever is the Ebola virus, which can be deadly for humans.
    The EHDV-6 virus is transmitted by midges, tiny biting flies, and causes extreme fevers in infected deer, which develop swollen heads, necks, tongues and eyelids, have bloody discharges from their noses, ulcers on tongues, and bleeding in the heart and lungs.

    In rare instances, this type of hemorrhagic fever has been known to spread to other animals, including elk and domestic cattle. But Labonte said cattle appear to have “a greater resistance” to the virus.

    Confirmation of the disease in Connecticut came on Oct. 15 when scientists reported that a deer found dead in Middletown had tested positive.


    Although two other versions of the virus have been known for decades in some states in the southern U.S., the EHDV-6 subtype was first identified in 2006 in Indiana and Illinois. The virus has since spread throughout the Midwest and has been reported in the east from Florida through North Carolina and Maryland.
    Now that it’s here, it will pop up again next year without a doubt.— Andy Labonte, Connecticut wildlife biologist

    Prior to 2006, the disease was only found in Australia, according to Labonte. He said it’s likely the virus came to the U.S. via “human transport, one way or another.”
    “Now that it’s here, it will pop up again next year without a doubt,” Labonte said.
    Sick or dead deer have also been reported in Chester, Haddam and Lyme, according to state officials.
    Outbreaks usually occur in late summer and early fall as the number of midges increases, experts say. The midges carrying the virus die off with the first frost.
    Labonte said drought conditions in the state may have contributed to the outbreak. He said the lack of rainfall resulted in a drying out of the landscape and the exposure of mudflats where the midges lay their eggs, giving deer browsing along the edges of these muddy areas a greater chance of being bitten by midges carrying the virus.
    Deer that contract the virus develop severe fevers and seek out water to ease their thirst or to cool off. Labonte said that’s why so many of the infected deer were found near or in water.
    The virus may reduce Connecticut’s very large deer population. Some areas in Connecticut are believed to have more than 40 deer per square mile, although some hunters are skeptical of such estimates.
    “It’s going to have some impacts,” Labonte said of Connecticut’s overall deer population, but he doubts that it will have “a major impact.”
    Connecticut has for decades been dealing with an overpopulation of white-tailed deer. Wildlife experts say too many deer can damage woodland habitats and suburban shrubbery, and contribute to the spread of Lyme disease to people.
    Labonte said this new type of virus “has had substantial impacts on local deer populations” in other states.

    Read more:
    http://www.courant.com/politics/hc-n...025-story.html

    Vegetarian: vejiˈte(ə)rēən/noun: old Indian word for lousy hunter.
    Excalibur Exocet, GT Laser II, 2" Bhoning Blazers 125g NAP Spitfire

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