Page 1 of 3 123 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 23

Thread: Ready? >>-------->

  1. #1
    14 pointer Grizzlyadam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    NWCT
    Posts
    1,232
    Images
    5

    Ready? >>-------->

    Its been so hot out that it almost doesn't feel like bow opens in less than a month. I'm just beginning to get the itch. I started running cams and marking trails when I get a little window of rain. Got the bow out and building on some form and a nice smooth release. Still need to go through my gear, maybe get some fresh broadheads and thermacell pads. Going to have to wash and air everything out. And a million other things.

    I think this will be a really great season for overall deer harvests, and lots of big bucks. With the combination of crazy acorns last year, low deer harvest, and the warm winter, we should have lots of deer this year, and the bucks should have plenty of extra energy to put into antler growth. I have been seeing a ton of spotted fawns recently all over the place, and the bucks have awesome racks already. Lots of 2.5 year olds will be hard to pass this year.

    I didn't get much scouting in over the winter with the lack of snow so only a few new spots for me this year. Still have about 15 to 20 different places in mind for early season. Gotta spread out the pressure as much as possible. I'm going to focus on doe spots until the freezer is happy, then hone in on pinch points and bedding as we approach November. From what I'm seeing the acorns are few as is to be expected. The only decent looking numbers are on the red oaks. So any productive whites should be deer magnets this year. Fruit trees are not looking too good this year either, so green fields should be getting some good action early season.



    Getting ready,and hoping for a great season. Wishing all you the best of luck.
    Anyone getting excited yet? What do your expectations for the upcoming season, and how are you preparing for it?

    Attached Images Attached Images

  2. #2
    Super Moderator Deadeye Logun S16 Champion, Backyard Shootout Champion TooManyHobbies's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2009
    Location
    Killingly
    Posts
    6,413
    Images
    7
    Well timed post Grizz. I'm heading out shortly to mow two fields. Hopefully they will be nice and green for the opener. Two years ago when there were no acorns, the cut field was a magnet.
    NOBODY EVER SHOT BAMBI....they shot his momma.

  3. #3
    Hey guys yes I think it's going to be a great season. I am seeing lots of does and fawns this summer and decent trail camera pics. I always look forward to bow season but this year I am mostly looking forward to youth gun season as my daughter got her liscence and she has been shooting my 243 very good so it should be interesting. I set up 2 of my better spots with double tree stands a couple weeks ago so it's going to be an awesome experience.

  4. #4
    14 pointer Grizzlyadam's Avatar
    Join Date
    Nov 2012
    Location
    NWCT
    Posts
    1,232
    Images
    5
    100 views and 2 replies. Sad! This site aint what it used to be.

  5. #5
    Super Moderator Dive4Blood's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2011
    Location
    North Stonington,CT
    Posts
    3,050
    Images
    72
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzlyadam View Post
    100 views and 2 replies. Sad! This site aint what it used to be.
    Lol, only 32 members have read this thread at the time of this post. But I can't disagree with your second remark.

    Speaking for myself, I just finished working a night shift which started at 2:30 in the afternoon all summer and I'm glad that is finished. Been fishing here and there all summer long, and got out with some members here a number of times...

    I did a ton of scouting last winter, then set up my stand sites early spring before green up. Put cams up a few weeks ago and won't check them till next month. A few spots I have a little tweaking to do which I am hitting on the weekends. Was in the woods today, will be out all day tomorrow, then I should be done with woods work. I put in a lot of time and miles in winter and spring doing my homework and finding sheds so I'm ready.

    Was out trying new bows last spring, but decided to finish some firearms projects and buy some gear instead of buying a new bow this year.

    I've seen very little acorns down here, and the woods is really dry. But I have seen tons of tracks in the dried up creeks and swamps, and they had an easy year last year food and weather wise. Just trying not to think about the opener every minute of the day, but as some of you know it is like a switch gets flipped and you can't shut it off till the end of the season.
    The Will Can Not Be Broken

  6. #6
    14 pointer WoodsmanA's Avatar
    Join Date
    May 2012
    Location
    Northwest CT
    Posts
    1,757
    Images
    1
    Quote Originally Posted by Grizzlyadam View Post
    100 views and 2 replies. Sad! This site aint what it used to be.
    What, trapping and slaying crows in summertime isn't interesting?
    Licensed Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator
    www.PAWServicesCT.com

  7. #7

    Ready? >>-------->

    Bushwhacked my way around a new stateland swamp today with decent sign. Been looking at buying a house in the area and wanted to check it out anyway. Almost made it the entire way around before finding someone else's stand. Found alternative spots that could still make it work.

    Been shooting my bow a bunch, Bishop and I hung our opening day stand and the one at his inlaws. Hoping the opening day stand produces again as we are 2/2 so far. Hoping the farm has the same early evening field action as it did 2 years ago with less acorns.

    Anybody know what kind of fungus this is?

  8. #8
    FOUNDER/Admin Andy's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2007
    Location
    The Woods in Willington
    Posts
    9,879
    Images
    25
    banner

    Share

    HEN OF THE WOODS (also known as MAITAKE,
    RAMSHEAD or SHEEPSHEAD MUSHROOM)
    Scientific name: Grifola frondosa

    IMPORTANT NOTICE
    The TEXT on this Webpage regarding
    EDIBLE WILD MUSHROOMS
    is as important to your SAFETY as the photographs!
    IF IN DOUBT, THROW THE MUSHROOM OUT!

    I assume responsibility for the accuracy of information provided at americanmushrooms.com regarding edible wild mushrooms. However, I cannot assume responsibility for the integrity of your use of the information I present here regarding edible wild mushrooms. It is up to you to exercise your own best judgement in the event that you choose to consume edible wild mushrooms. Specifically, it is encumbent upon you to read all the text presented here that relates to the particular edible wild mushroom species involved to ensure that you have effectively ruled out dangerous poisonous/toxic wild mushrooms. Hurriedly comparing wild mushroom specimens to photographs of known edible wild mushrooms in hopes of determining that they are indeed the edible species can readily be FATAL!

    Keep in mind that some of these pages include photographs of poisonous mushrooms which resemble edible wild mushroom species; again, reading the accompanying text and applying that information is absolutely vital to your safety!

    Note that even with some of the best, safest, most popular edible wild mushroom species, it is possible for an individual human being to have an allergic reaction to a particular species. This happens with the grocery-store button mushroom (Agaricus bisporus), it happens with edible wild morel mushrooms, and it happens with strawberries.

    It is also possible for illness to result from consuming mushrooms that are decaying, contaminated by pollution, or otherwise not in good condition. Before perusing the section of this Webpage that presents photographs of and text about edible wild mushrooms (and some of their toxic "look-alikes"!), you must read "The Mycophagist's Ten Commandments," which explains several hazards and provides advice on how to avoid those hazards.

    Most importantly, be doubtful and be skeptical: Use the mushroom's description to seek evidence that the mushroom you've found is NOT the edible wild mushroom species whose photograph it resembles!

    –David Fischer, Author of Edible Wild Mushrooms of North America (1992, Univ. of Texas Press)


    The best mushroom books are available in the AmericanMushrooms.com Bookstore


    HEN OF THE WOODS (also known as MAITAKE,
    RAMSHEAD or SHEEPSHEAD MUSHROOM)
    Scientific name: Grifola frondosa

    image - photo of the Hen of the Woods, Sheepshead, or Maitake mushroom (Grifola frondosa)

    The Maitake mushroom (it has several "common" names including Hen of the Woods, Ram's Head and Sheep's Head, and here we shall use them interchangeably) is one of the best-known of all edible wild mushrooms, and it's also the one that offers the biggest harvests in many areas, for a single Maitake / Hen of the Woods specimen will often weigh as much as twenty pounds (exceptional specimens over 50 pounds are also found!). Maitake / Sheepshead is quite abundant in parts of the Eastern U.S. where there are abundant large oak trees. I've seen a single oak tree yield as much as 100 pounds of Maitake / Hen of the Woods in one season!

    image - photo of the Hen of the Woods, Sheepshead, or Maitake mushroom (Grifola frondosa)

    Grifolas, as many of the more knowledgeable amateur mycophiles call them because Maitake is the only species in genus Grifola, are polypore mushrooms, meaning the undersurface of each tiny "cap" has a layer of downward pointing tubes; the open ends of the tubes are visible as "pores." The color of a Maitake / Ram's-head mushroom's upper surfaces varies considerably in color, from pale tan to dark brown; most often, it is predominately gray, tan or brown. In my experience, Maitake / Hen of the Woods mushrooms tend to be most darkly pigmented when they grow in open spots where they are exposed to direct sunlight. Maitake / Sheepshead is never orange or reddish except that old specimens (which should not be eaten) may be colonized by colonies of mold, yeast or bacteria that produce yellow pigments. The undersides of the Maitake's / Hen of the Woods "caps" are white, and close examination (a hand lens or "magnifying glass" can help) reveals tiny white pores which are smallest near the edges of the caps. The Maitake / Sheepshead mushroom does not have gills!

    Maitake / Hen of the Woods is basically a fall mushroom, but summer and (rarely) even spring fruitings have been reported.
    Shoot a Coyote save a Fawn

  9. #9
    Hey Adam,

    My 2 spots one town east of you had no acorns at all last year and we saw a record few deer, even on camera. I'm hoping for an acorn cycle this year. The two bucks we got during rifle season had been eating mountain laurel and grass and tasted accordingly. I haven't been down for the last few Septembers, waiting for the first 2 weeks of November instead, we're still saltwater fishing and NH opens 9/15 as well. I always give my Norfolk buddy my first Ct deer and Sept was fairly reliable for filling the freezer. Good luck, I'll be following your exploits. Larry

  10. #10
    Thanks Andy. I was wondering if that's what it was. I asked Adam if it was "chicken of the woods" haha. If anyone is confident in the ID, I'm happy to harvest and bring them to you.

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •