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Thread: 2015/2016 Fur Market Outlook

  1. #1
    14 pointer WoodsmanA's Avatar
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    2015/2016 Fur Market Outlook

    Well, with colder nights upon us and the general trapping season just over a month away, the predictions for the upcoming fur season are coming in. After last year's prices in the markets, how could things get any worse?? I didn't sell any of the beaver or raccoon I trapped. Held over all my stretched fur thinking to sell it this next season. In the meantime, I just set up the fur shed to do some tanning over the next couple weeks and try my hand and making a pair of beaver mittens and a raccoon hat out of my better furs. Guess I should learn how to sew...

    In any case, the market looks to have taken a turn for the better, but it's still low compared to prices just a couple years back. The best seller for any fur coming out of Connecticut will be coyote and fisher. So all of you who have taken the coyote land trapping course, this is the year to get into it. If anything, think of it as deer and wild turkey management... Actually, the latest report states that fur dealers are picked clean of coyote furs and will be rushing to get their hands on coyote. Prices for coyote may even go up.



    Wild K9s:

    Northeastern coyotes looking to sell in the $50 to $60 range for well handled fur, size large and up. Averages expected to be in the $20 to $35 range.

    Northeastern red fox should see $25 to $35 on the high end with averages on heavy furs coming out at $15 to $20. The Chinese market for red fox fur is still in the slumps.

    Grey fox should come in at $15 to $20 averages. The Russian buyers appear more interested in greys lately ... but their poor economy and the sanctions against Russia wont help U.S. trappers much.

    Wild Kittys:

    Too bad we still can't trap bobcats here in Connecticut. Northern cats are bringing $50 to $100 averages. Lynx is bringing $150 top end.

    Tree Huggers:

    Trappers east of the Connecticut river should feel blessed that the resident fisher population is exploding there. Heavily furred female fisher is expected to move at $55 to $70. Males will bring $25 to $40. For those of us west of the river trapping the introduced fisher population ... it'd be nice to pull in just one! I wish we had marten here ... Marten is moving at $55 to $70 with averages about $20 below top end.

    Aquatics:

    Beaver is looking to move at $10 to $15 this season. That's an increase from the poor $5 per pelt we saw last season. Beaver castoreum is way up this season to $40 to $60 per pound. Muskrats are down from $10 averages last season to $3 to $4 dollars this season. This is largely due to the ranched mink trade. Wild mink will move at $5 to $10 tops. Don't expect much there. Otter is expected to come out at $40 to $60 for heavy northern furs. Averages for otter looking to be $20 to $35. That is still an increase over last season.

    Raccoon, Opossum & Skunk:

    Release what you can. It's just not worth it. XXL heavy raccoon furs may be worth saving for the freezer to see what happens next season. At best for this season is $6 to $10. The advice coming in from the ol' timers is to wait until after Thanksgiving to trap raccoons to ensure better primeness if you're looking to sell. We'll see more for skunk this season surprisingly. Wide white stripes are moving at $8 to $10. Thin stripes are looking at $1. I'll make a call down to WCS to see what the payout is per ounce of skunks essence. Opossum will see $2 to $3. If you trap 'em, use them as practice and keep the fur for tying flies or something else.

    The Bottom Line:

    With all this in mind it's important to note that the market is still incredibly unstable. Sanctions against Russia are preventing Russian buyers from importing U.S. furs and the poor Russian economic situation isn't allowing buyers to spend Rubles outside of Russia. The market buyers from Greece and Turkey are, of course, unable to do much with their suffering economies. The biggest buyer of furs in Greece was Russian tourist but Russian citizens can't afford to travel currently so that hurts. China is a mess. Nothing much happening there for the fur trade. This season looks to be all about buyers from Europe and Korea.
    Licensed Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator
    www.PAWServicesCT.com

  2. #2
    Can't wait!

  3. #3
    14 pointer Du Ct's Avatar
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    Getting close! Cant wait to dye the traps
    "When it comes your time to die, sing your death song and die like a hero going home." Tecumseh

  4. #4
    10 Point wishinone's Avatar
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    At these prices I don't know why you guys even bother, then again I do understand why. The last year I trapped was 1980 in New York, there was a big drop in the market that year and I went to a job that had me working a 12 hour day so I didn't have the time. In 1979 prime reds bought $75, XXXL prime coon $60 and muskrat ran $8 to $10, in 1980 the top price for red fox was $50 and grey fox $20 the price for XXXL coon dropped to $24. My son and grandson still trap beaver near Cooperstown NY, the pelts are tanned and sold on ebay.

  5. #5
    14 pointer WoodsmanA's Avatar
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    Yeah it's not worth it to trap for value anymore, and I don't trap for pelt value at market. I just find it interesting to follow the fur trade. I trap to keep an American heritage going. Trapping is a dying thing. Most people nowadays are too lazy to even think about it. It's hard work and it keeps me in shape. I trap to keep me busy throughout the winter when everyone else is afraid to go outside. I trap because it keeps me in touch with nature and gets me down and dirty with the animals. The rewardong feeling of scouting a furbearer, finding it's sign and successfully trapping it is incredible. I trap to be part of science backed conservation. What trappers do benefits game species and non game species alike. Just the pure enjoyment of being out in the woods on a bitterly cold day checking traps gets my adrenaline pumping. Breaking trail with snowshoes. Finding a new beaver hut. Stumbling on to fresh coyote sign. Trapping to me certainly isn't about what i can get at market. Market prices are just a small perk to modern trapping in Connnecticut. There are a lot of reasons to continue to trap. I think most all of us that do still trap do it for personal reasons.
    Licensed Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator
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  6. #6
    Super Moderator Deadeye Logun S16 Champion, Backyard Shootout Champion TooManyHobbies's Avatar
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    Well said Adam. We spend more in gas than we get back in pelts. I tell myself every year, I may not trap. Then the deer season ends and winter is too long to do nothing. So I grab some steel and gear and head out. Kill a coyote and save a deer. Do winter time deer scouting at the same time. Skin a skunk in the basement and have laughs for years about the one that "popped" in my hand. Wife still thinks it's funny, but she didn't then. lol. Best part is looking at the put up fur just before sending it to sale or tannery.
    I think this year, IF I trap, will mostly be targeting coyotes.
    NOBODY EVER SHOT BAMBI....they shot his momma.

  7. #7
    14 pointer MTN_Infantry's Avatar
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    Never got into trapping but took the courses to get some basic knowledge about it. I shoot every coyote I see when I'm out. Never thought about tanning the skins and trying to get a new box of ammo


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    When your time comes to die, be not like those whose hearts are filled with fear of death, so that when their time comes they weep and pray for a little more time to live their lives over again in a different way. Sing your death song, and die like a hero going home

  8. #8
    Why I bother? Because i feel like a little kid on Christmas morning when I have fur waiting for me in the morning!

  9. #9
    14 pointer Du Ct's Avatar
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    Its something that brings variety into my life, some animals i cant hunt. Same reason why i hunt crows, doves, pigeons, turkey, geese, ducks, coyotes and the occasional deer.....its all variety and it brings very valuable skills in my opinion. Sitting in a tree and waiting is not valuable to me.


    And i forgot, beaver meat rocks
    Last edited by Du Ct; 10-08-2015 at 01:03 PM.
    "When it comes your time to die, sing your death song and die like a hero going home." Tecumseh

  10. #10
    14 pointer WoodsmanA's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Du Ct View Post
    And i forgot, beaver meat rocks
    Yes!! Everyone I gave a package of beaver meat to last year, along with my no fail beav meat cooking instructions, loved it.
    Licensed Nuisance Wildlife Control Operator
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