Page 3 of 3 FirstFirst 123
Results 21 to 22 of 22

Thread: Baiting in front of trail cameras

  1. #21
    Button Buck
    Join Date
    Dec 2011
    Location
    Ledyard
    Posts
    11

    Thanks for the info

    Quote Originally Posted by EnCon Police View Post
    Actually it's both...the littering and the attracting of possible dangerous animals. If you create a condition where you are creating a hazard on state land at the minimum it violates another section of the regulations for Disorderly Conduct (the regulation, not the criminal charge...two different things)

    (o) Disorderly conduct. Disorderly conduct, public nudity, intoxication, and obscene or indecent behavior are prohibited, and all forms of rough play, or activities or contests creating hazards to persons or property, including, but not limited to, the use of paintball guns or other similar devices, are prohibited.



    A better way to look at it may be from a liability standpoint.

    You intentionally put something (bait - even non-consumable) in a public place for the purpose of attracting wildlife, knowing that in addition to deer it may attract bears, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons, skunks and other animals that have the potential of creating a public health (rabies) or safety risk and someone is injured by one of these animals then it becomes a major issue. I'm sure that lawyers would be lining up to file lawsuits for something like that.

    The key is the fact that it's a public place where you cannot control access to your bait or the camera. If you want to put your camera out with bait on private land where you can control who has access, have at it. But on state land we have a variety of recreational users. We have photographers, hunters, birdwatchers, hikers, campers, anglers, bikers,etc. It's a shared resource and to keep everyone reasonable safe we need to put some limitations on activities that could place other users in potential harm. We do allow hunting in multi-user areas of state forests, but we take steps to ensure that the public knows that it's hunting season and that they have the potential of encountering hunters in a state forest and we encourage them to dress appropriately to warn hunters.

    Then we've also got the potential for a complaint from you when someone steals your trail camera from state land.
    Thank you very much for the clarification. I'll pass the word around and let others know the reason you should not bait on state land.

  2. #22
    Quote Originally Posted by EnCon Police View Post
    Actually it's both...the littering and the attracting of possible dangerous animals. If you create a condition where you are creating a hazard on state land at the minimum it violates another section of the regulations for Disorderly Conduct (the regulation, not the criminal charge...two different things)

    (o) Disorderly conduct. Disorderly conduct, public nudity, intoxication, and obscene or indecent behavior are prohibited, and all forms of rough play, or activities or contests creating hazards to persons or property, including, but not limited to, the use of paintball guns or other similar devices, are prohibited.

    A better way to look at it may be from a liability standpoint.

    You intentionally put something (bait - even non-consumable) in a public place for the purpose of attracting wildlife, knowing that in addition to deer it may attract bears, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons, skunks and other animals that have the potential of creating a public health (rabies) or safety risk and someone is injured by one of these animals then it becomes a major issue. I'm sure that lawyers would be lining up to file lawsuits for something like that.

    The key is the fact that it's a public place where you cannot control access to your bait or the camera. If you want to put your camera out with bait on private land where you can control who has access, have at it. But on state land we have a variety of recreational users. We have photographers, hunters, birdwatchers, hikers, campers, anglers, bikers,etc. It's a shared resource and to keep everyone reasonable safe we need to put some limitations on activities that could place other users in potential harm. We do allow hunting in multi-user areas of state forests, but we take steps to ensure that the public knows that it's hunting season and that they have the potential of encountering hunters in a state forest and we encourage them to dress appropriately to warn hunters.

    Then we've also got the potential for a complaint from you when someone steals your trail camera from state land.
    Second part is a very good explanation!

    If and when a Sunday hunting bill comes up next year that is a private land only bill, like last year's failed attempt, this explanation should be used to explain the difference between access to private and public land. Its a good counter to the anti's argument that Sunday hunting on private land somehow creates risk to the general public. Its also especially persuasive as its a written opinion of a high ranking CT law enforcement officer.

Tags for this Thread

Bookmarks

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •