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Thread: Baiting in front of trail cameras

  1. #11
    2012CTHS Supporter CtChuck's Avatar
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    I could see where baiting on state land could bring in "bears"-



    CDY_0012.JPGCDY_0013.JPG


    Chuck

  2. #12
    NO need to bait any thing but a trap we are hunting not killing

  3. #13
    OK....I was trying to take a soft approach, I guess that doesn't work.

    PARK & FOREST GENERAL
    Section 23-4-1

    (b) Vandalism and possession of food or beverage inside historic structures. (1) No person shall deface, destroy, alter, remove or otherwise injure in any manner any structures, buildings, vegetation, earth or rock material, trees, or fuelwood, nor shall any wildlife be molested or disturbed except as authorized by the Department of Environmental Protection. The Commissioner may grant upon written application, permission to collect specimens, take samples and conduct other investigations for scientific or educational purposes. Such permission shall be in writing and shall be subject to such conditions as the Commissioner deems necessary.

    (j) Littering. No person shall dispose of any material in a state park or forest, except in receptacles provided for such disposal.

    (k) Dumping. Disposing of any material in a state park or forest which was not accumulated during the use of such facilities is prohibited.

    NO PERSON SHALL DISPOSE ANY MATERIAL
    , bait would fall under the ANY material unless as under section (b) AUTHORIZED BY THE DEPARTMENT. We are not authorizing the use of bait on state land for photographing wildlife.


    Verb:
    dispose (third-person singular simple present disposes, present participle disposing, simple past and past participle disposed)

    1. (intransitive, used with "of") To eliminate or to get rid of something. I dispose of my trash in the garbage can.
    2. To distribute and put in place.
    3. To deal out; to assign to a use.
    4. To incline

  4. #14
    Quote Originally Posted by CtChuck View Post
    I could see where baiting on state land could bring in "bears"-

    CDY_0012.JPGCDY_0013.JPG


    Chuck
    i gotta say it out loud. u got a bear and a pig on trail cam! aaaaaaaaaaahahahahahahahahhaaha. sorry i couldnt resist

  5. #15
    CTHS Moderator Spotted Crow's Avatar
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    Clarification in squirrel candy! I definately misunderstood last winter.
    " Bowtech RPM 360 70#, Bowtech Invasion 60# Carbon Express Red, Carbon Express Maxima Hunter, Carbon Express F15, GrimReaper SS, Rage Hyperdermic"

  6. #16
    Button Buck
    Join Date
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnCon Police View Post
    OK....I was trying to take a soft approach, I guess that doesn't work.

    PARK & FOREST GENERAL
    Section 23-4-1

    (b) Vandalism and possession of food or beverage inside historic structures. (1) No person shall deface, destroy, alter, remove or otherwise injure in any manner any structures, buildings, vegetation, earth or rock material, trees, or fuelwood, nor shall any wildlife be molested or disturbed except as authorized by the Department of Environmental Protection. The Commissioner may grant upon written application, permission to collect specimens, take samples and conduct other investigations for scientific or educational purposes. Such permission shall be in writing and shall be subject to such conditions as the Commissioner deems necessary.

    (j) Littering. No person shall dispose of any material in a state park or forest, except in receptacles provided for such disposal.

    (k) Dumping. Disposing of any material in a state park or forest which was not accumulated during the use of such facilities is prohibited.

    NO PERSON SHALL DISPOSE ANY MATERIAL
    , bait would fall under the ANY material unless as under section (b) AUTHORIZED BY THE DEPARTMENT. We are not authorizing the use of bait on state land for photographing wildlife.


    Verb:
    dispose (third-person singular simple present disposes, present participle disposing, simple past and past participle disposed)

    1. (intransitive, used with "of") To eliminate or to get rid of something. I dispose of my trash in the garbage can.
    2. To distribute and put in place.
    3. To deal out; to assign to a use.
    4. To incline
    I completely agree that placing a consumable bait on state grounds falls under the littering law. I'm just questioning the reasoning behind not baiting in front of a trail camera on state land. Is the littering the main concern or is the safety of the other recreational users of the land the main concern? The issue I'm having a hard time understanding is the difference between a non-consumable bait and a consumable bait to attract deer to your camera. If you can achieve the same results with both(attracting possibly dangerous animals), then why isn't there a concern for using a non-consumable bait to attract deer to your camera? To me bait is bait. One may work better than the other. I guess it probably would have been easier to just say no its littering but saying the state just prefers you not to due to safety concerns, leaves quite the gray area.

  7. #17
    14 pointer Chefjlevy87's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by EnCon Police View Post

    (j) Littering. No person shall dispose of any material in a state park or forest, except in receptacles provided for such disposal.

    Solution; place your cameras near said receptacles

  8. #18
    Quote Originally Posted by OutdoorsDan View Post
    I completely agree that placing a consumable bait on state grounds falls under the littering law. I'm just questioning the reasoning behind not baiting in front of a trail camera on state land. Is the littering the main concern or is the safety of the other recreational users of the land the main concern? The issue I'm having a hard time understanding is the difference between a non-consumable bait and a consumable bait to attract deer to your camera. If you can achieve the same results with both(attracting possibly dangerous animals), then why isn't there a concern for using a non-consumable bait to attract deer to your camera? To me bait is bait. One may work better than the other. I guess it probably would have been easier to just say no its littering but saying the state just prefers you not to due to safety concerns, leaves quite the gray area.
    Actually it's both...the littering and the attracting of possible dangerous animals. If you create a condition where you are creating a hazard on state land at the minimum it violates another section of the regulations for Disorderly Conduct (the regulation, not the criminal charge...two different things)

    (o) Disorderly conduct. Disorderly conduct, public nudity, intoxication, and obscene or indecent behavior are prohibited, and all forms of rough play, or activities or contests creating hazards to persons or property, including, but not limited to, the use of paintball guns or other similar devices, are prohibited.

    A better way to look at it may be from a liability standpoint.

    You intentionally put something (bait - even non-consumable) in a public place for the purpose of attracting wildlife, knowing that in addition to deer it may attract bears, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons, skunks and other animals that have the potential of creating a public health (rabies) or safety risk and someone is injured by one of these animals then it becomes a major issue. I'm sure that lawyers would be lining up to file lawsuits for something like that.

    The key is the fact that it's a public place where you cannot control access to your bait or the camera. If you want to put your camera out with bait on private land where you can control who has access, have at it. But on state land we have a variety of recreational users. We have photographers, hunters, birdwatchers, hikers, campers, anglers, bikers,etc. It's a shared resource and to keep everyone reasonable safe we need to put some limitations on activities that could place other users in potential harm. We do allow hunting in multi-user areas of state forests, but we take steps to ensure that the public knows that it's hunting season and that they have the potential of encountering hunters in a state forest and we encourage them to dress appropriately to warn hunters.

    Then we've also got the potential for a complaint from you when someone steals your trail camera from state land.

  9. #19
    Cal45
    Guest
    That's about as crystal clear of an explanation as you can get. Thanks Captain.

  10. #20
    Button Buck
    Join Date
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    11

    Thanks for the info

    Quote Originally Posted by EnCon Police View Post
    Actually it's both...the littering and the attracting of possible dangerous animals. If you create a condition where you are creating a hazard on state land at the minimum it violates another section of the regulations for Disorderly Conduct (the regulation, not the criminal charge...two different things)

    (o) Disorderly conduct. Disorderly conduct, public nudity, intoxication, and obscene or indecent behavior are prohibited, and all forms of rough play, or activities or contests creating hazards to persons or property, including, but not limited to, the use of paintball guns or other similar devices, are prohibited.

    A better way to look at it may be from a liability standpoint.

    You intentionally put something (bait - even non-consumable) in a public place for the purpose of attracting wildlife, knowing that in addition to deer it may attract bears, coyotes, foxes, bobcats, raccoons, skunks and other animals that have the potential of creating a public health (rabies) or safety risk and someone is injured by one of these animals then it becomes a major issue. I'm sure that lawyers would be lining up to file lawsuits for something like that.

    The key is the fact that it's a public place where you cannot control access to your bait or the camera. If you want to put your camera out with bait on private land where you can control who has access, have at it. But on state land we have a variety of recreational users. We have photographers, hunters, birdwatchers, hikers, campers, anglers, bikers,etc. It's a shared resource and to keep everyone reasonable safe we need to put some limitations on activities that could place other users in potential harm. We do allow hunting in multi-user areas of state forests, but we take steps to ensure that the public knows that it's hunting season and that they have the potential of encountering hunters in a state forest and we encourage them to dress appropriately to warn hunters.

    Then we've also got the potential for a complaint from you when someone steals your trail camera from state land.
    Thank you very much for the clarification. I'll pass the word around and let others know the reason you should not bait on state land.

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