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BigOutdoors
02-11-2011, 05:11 AM
ICE FISHING REPORT NUMBER 6 2/10/2011

SAFETY REMINDER: DEP reminds winter anglers that SAFETY COMES FIRST! Be aware that ice thickness varies on all water bodies due to a number of environmental factors including in-lake water circulatory patterns, snow cover and the type and amounts of recent precipitation. Please check the ice carefully before venturing out and check repeatedly to make sure that ice thickness is sufficient. Local bait and tackle shops are often excellent resources for the most current information on ice conditions. Always let someone know where you are going and when you’ll return.

ICE FISHING REPORT
This winter has offered up an extended ice fishing season. However, with a lot of deep snow to cross to get to their favorite fishing hole, anglers do have to work to get to their fish this year. Snowshoes or even cross country skis have been useful. Anglers should be aware that a number of access and parking areas are currently buried in several feet of snow & ice and difficult to access.

TROUT – For trout, try the following locations Black Rock Pond (lots of action reported), West Hill Pond (fish in 20 feet of water), East Twin Lake, Mohawk Pond, Black Pond (Meriden), Squantz Pond (4 pound brown among the recent catches), Crystal Lake (Ellington) and Beach Pond.
TTTakkke sooomeooonnne fffishhhinnnggg!

NORTHERN PIKE – Fishing for these monsters continues to be excellent with a solid 20 lb, 39 inch pike among the catches. Best reports are from Pachaug Pond, Mansfield Hollow Reservoir, Bantam Lake, Beseck Lake and the coves along the Connecticut River.

WALLEYE – Mashapaug Lake, Coventry Lake and Gardner Lake (fish up to 24 inches) continue to produce some walleye action.

YELLOW PERCH – Lots of perch are being caught, with reports from Coventry Lake (17 for one angler), Candlewood Lake, Long Pond (Salisbury), Pachaug Pond, Beseck Lake, Mohawk Pond, Lake Waramaug, Winchester Lake, Park Pond, Beseck Lake, Mudge Pond, Bantam Lake, Hayward Lake and Dog Pond.

PANFISH - Early mornings are the best for these winter favorites, jigging with corn or grubs on your favorite lure while moving from place to place is the way to go for these delicious fish. Locations to try include Black Rock Pond, Candlewood Lake, Silver Lake, Long Pond (Salisbury), Lake Waramaug, Pachaug Pond, Scoville Reservoir, Beseck Lake, Bishop Swamp Pond, Red Cedar Lake, Lake Williams and Wethersfield Cove.

CHAIN PICKEREL – Good fishing for this ice fishing favorite reported at Pachaug Pond, Lake Williams, Beseck Lake, Black Pond (Meriden), Silver Lake, Dog Pond, Hayward Lake, Quaddick Reservoir and Rogers Lake.

LARGEMOUTH/SMALLMOUTH BASS – Bass are being found at Red Cedar Lake (24 incher among the catches), Highland Lake (including a 6.8 lb bass), Long Pond (13 fish), Candlewood Lake (20 inch smallmouth), Lake Williams, Scoville Reservoir, Kenosia Lake, Dog Pond, Winchester Lake, Ball Pond, Rogers Lake, Quinebaug Lake, Pattaganset Lake, Mudge Pond and Crystal Lake (Ellington).

TIPS & TRICKS – for BLACK CRAPPIE (as found on nesportsman.com)
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Finding the deeper water will help locate a school of hungry crappie.
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Black Crappie are light sensitive.

COOKING PANFISH
BY
GRANDMA ‘G’
(instructions by cooks.com)
Ingredients
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1 cup all-purpose flour
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1 egg, beaten
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1 teaspoon garlic powder
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1/2 teaspoon ground black pepper
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1 1/2 cups beer
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2 pounds fish fillets

Directions
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In a small mixing bowl add flour, egg, garlic powder, and black pepper. Stir in 1 cup beer (you can add more than one cup to obtain your desired texture).
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Add 2 Tbls. of cooking oil to a fry pan and bring to a medium heat.
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Add fish fillets to the batter and cover both sides.
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Cook in oil 3-5 minutes per side (depending on thickness of fish) until golden brown.
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Serve with your favorite tartar sauce or lemon juice.



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Use ultra light rods with 2-4 pound-test clear monofilament.
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Suggested hook sizes are No. 4 or No. 6.
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Add a small split-shot a foot above the hook and add a small bobber.
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Use spring bobbers since they are easy to see from farther way.
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As crappie can be very light biters.
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Always sharpen your hooks.
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Artificials such as ice jigs and small spoons work well.
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When using a jig, tip it with a minnow or grub.
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Chartreuse and hot pink lure colors work well.
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Swedish pimples work very well.
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Be attentive while the lure is falling as that is when a strike normally occurs.
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Give a jig 2 or 3 upward strokes then let it slowly settle back down.
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Find the depth at which the schools are located (usually 10-17 feet over 20 feet).
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Crappie look up towards their prey.
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Start fishing with several lines at different depths until the correct depth is located.
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Typically, schools can be found near the bottom to several feet above.
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Always keep your lines moving.
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Movement in your bait is key when crappie fishing.
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Check your bait often and replace any that are tired.
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Crappie anglers cut 4 to 6 holes close to each other.
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Try hooking minnow through the lips to give them a more natural presentation.

Reminder-LICENSE FEE CREDITS AVAILABLE
During the 2010 session of the General Assembly, legislation was approved and signed into law in April reducing many of the fees for sportsmen’s licenses and permits. This was followed in June by legislation authorizing a credit to be applied against the fee for any 2011 sportsmen’s license, permit or tag when purchase of a license, permit or tag had been made at the higher prices in place between October 1, 2009 and April 14, 2010. The credit amount will be the difference between the higher amount paid during that time period and the amount set by the new fee structure established April 14, 2010.
For information about these credits, please visit the DEP website license fees and credits page: www.ct.gov/dep/sportsmensfeereduction (http://www.ct.gov/dep/sportsmensfeereduction)

Special notice –
PROPOSED FISHERIES & WILDLIFE REGULATIONS:
TUCKER®
GOES FISHING
Dewd We’re going fishing for crappie. What’s a crappie? Every week we go fishing! BION I love this. I can’t wait. Are we going to see Josh again? He’s fun to be with. We run & slide on the ice together. What do you do when you catch a crappie? OMG It’s going to be food. Beer batter fish. AYCE Yum! There should be ‘No Child Left Inside’ when you can have fun and eat like this.
Put something on the ice and cook it with Grandma ‘G’s’ instructions. For Real!
Take a child fishing. BB4N ‘T’


The Department of Environmental Protection is an affirmative action/equal opportunity employer and service provider. In conformance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, DEP makes every effort to provide equally effective services for persons with disabilities. Individuals with disabilities who need this information in an alternative format, to allow them to benefit and/or participate in the agency’s programs and services, should call 860-424-3051 or 860-418-5937 or e-mail Marcia Bonitto, ADA Coordinator, at Marcia.Bonitto@CT.Gov (Marcia.Bonitto@CT.Gov). Persons who are hearing impaired should call the State of Connecticut relay number 711.

CONNECTICUT DEPARTMENT OF ENVIRONMENTAL PROTECTION
79 Elm Street, Hartford, CT 06106
www.ct.gov/dep (http://www.ct.gov/dep)