PDA

View Full Version : any bow suggestions?



Commandhawk
01-19-2010, 10:00 PM
I'm thinking of getting into bow hunting but i'm not really sure which bow i should get. Any suggestions for a bow that would be a good started bow and would last me a while?

*HuntЯ*
01-19-2010, 10:59 PM
Are you any where near Halls Arrow in manchester? You can test any bow you like and they have some nice used stuff too, Well worth the trip, they are second to none.

CTtrapper
01-19-2010, 11:01 PM
It depends on what you want to spend.
I'm assuming your talking about a compound bow.
I've owned PSE, Hoyt, Bear, Martin and Mathews..I 've shot just about everything else.
For a great bow, the best IMHO, Mathews is the way to go
They originated the one cam design that everyone else copied.
they are so easy to set up and tune and I could pick that bow up after not having shot it for 6 months and hit a 6" plate at 20 yards... easy..with a broadhead
You will kill a lot of Deer with a Mathews.
http://mathewsinc.com/
.02

MoodusHunter
01-20-2010, 07:41 AM
Here is a list of all the new 2010 bows:
Bow specs 2010 (http://www.cthuntingnshooting.com/vBforum/attachment.php?attachmentid=370&d=1258296562)

I would first start out by making a few key decisions, 1) are you going to primarily hunt from a ground blind or a tree stand? this could determine axle size 2) Do you have an addictive personality? if you do might as well buy a good bow now instead of trading up in a year. 3) new/used has advantages but I always rather have a new bow then a used one just my opinion. 4) the accesories on the bow are to me even more important then the bow itself. Check ebay for accesories, you can get good prices. Also archerytalk.com has tons of info and a nice size classified section.

In the archery section stonecrusher and myself have been posting gear reviews for the most common arrow rests, a boring read im sure but it has some info that could be useful.

If you never shot before I would recomend taking a few lessons that way you start off with only good habits, the bad ones are hard to break!

Bows/accesories are sold in a few places in CT. You have Dick's (wouldn't go near for a bow), Cabela's (which is questionable in my eyes for set up but they have good prices) Hall's (I've personally had some issues but they aren't that bad) and Andover (my favorite, they will do anything for you no matter how long it takes and then charge you next to nothing). There are others but I don't have any first hand knowledge with them.

hammer
01-20-2010, 09:07 AM
I have a Mission made by Mathews, I like it! There a good bow in the $350 - $550 range. As far as a Dealer/Proshop i would have to recommend Center Sports in Columbia....

CTtrapper
01-20-2010, 10:28 AM
I second that, forget Dicks or Sports Authority for a Bow...Go to Halls Arrow.
Forget Mail order too as far as the bow goes...

passinthru63
01-20-2010, 12:08 PM
don't ever and I mean every ask a bowhunter what Bow to get. :icon_e_biggrin: We never agree on anything when it comes to a particular piece of equipment and this comes from teaching bowhunter education for the last 20 years. But I bet we will all agree upon the following.

1. There isn't a bow on the market today that can NOT do the job of cleanly and humanely harvesting an animal WHEN the person using it practices and becomes proficient and stays within their own limitations and the limitations of their equipment.

2. When first starting out I strongly suggest a pro shop for your purchase as opposed to online catalogs or big box stores that do NOT have the inhouse expertise. There are many good ones in CT and you will get plenty of suggestions. Just being able to shoot many different styles, makes and models as well as access to accessories, arrows, etc. Once you become knowledgeable and comfortable, knock your self out with catalog and online purchasing.

3. Proper fit is way more important than Brand of BOW..no ands or ifs about it. If your bow isn't matched to your body, physical limitations and shooting style you will be totally aggravated.

4. Price range - You have to remember that it is NOT just the bow, but all the accessories needed to get started. To get started shooting you need a bow, a rest, sights, finger tab or release, arrows and field points and this stuff is NOT cheap. To hunt you have to add Broadheads - be careful when you aks for opinions here as well :eek: some type of arrow quiver to securely and safely hold those sharp broadheads in place. Then you have things that become preference or necessary like stabilizers, string silencers, peep sights, wrist straps, bow case and on and on and on.

I've been bowhunting since I was 12, which is 32 years now and my last bow was bought at a pro shop - Halls to be specific and yes I shoot a Mathews - changed over from Hoyt after many years. I went to the pro shop once again for their expertise and the wide selection available. Even after 32 years a little tune up doesn't hurt.

Good luck and welcome to the bowhunting family!

TooManyHobbies
01-20-2010, 03:40 PM
Other things to consider: Do you have a lot of time to practice, or just "enough time" to practice. Are you mechanical? Meaning, sights, releases, strings and the like have their pros and cons. If your not into the bells and whistles, traditional gear is another option.

I've used a Hoyt compound for years, but one year I dropped it from my stand and it exploded. Hunt over. I gathered up the pieces and had to bring to a shop. I'm not that mechanical, didn't have a bow press, etc. I bought a recurve. Not much can go wrong, except the string. carry an extra and you're back in the game. I've still had to use the Hoyt on and off, but will use the 'curve from now on, once my shoulder heals. It's also more enjoyable to shoot and lighter. But, it takes a lot of practice.
As CTtrapper says, he can pick up his mathews and shoot acurately after not touching it for a year, but that tends to make you not practice as you should, which results in lost animals. Just my .02.

Quigly
01-20-2010, 03:44 PM
don't ever and I mean every ask a bowhunter what Bow to get. :icon_e_biggrin: We never agree on anything when it comes to a particular piece of equipment and this comes from teaching bowhunter education for the last 20 years. But I bet we will all agree upon the following.

1. There isn't a bow on the market today that can NOT do the job of cleanly and humanely harvesting an animal WHEN the person using it practices and becomes proficient and stays within their own limitations and the limitations of their equipment.

2. When first starting out I strongly suggest a pro shop for your purchase as opposed to online catalogs or big box stores that do NOT have the inhouse expertise. There are many good ones in CT and you will get plenty of suggestions. Just being able to shoot many different styles, makes and models as well as access to accessories, arrows, etc. Once you become knowledgeable and comfortable, knock your self out with catalog and online purchasing.

3. Proper fit is way more important than Brand of BOW..no ands or ifs about it. If your bow isn't matched to your body, physical limitations and shooting style you will be totally aggravated.

4. Price range - You have to remember that it is NOT just the bow, but all the accessories needed to get started. To get started shooting you need a bow, a rest, sights, finger tab or release, arrows and field points and this stuff is NOT cheap. To hunt you have to add Broadheads - be careful when you aks for opinions here as well :eek: some type of arrow quiver to securely and safely hold those sharp broadheads in place. Then you have things that become preference or necessary like stabilizers, string silencers, peep sights, wrist straps, bow case and on and on and on.

I've been bowhunting since I was 12, which is 32 years now and my last bow was bought at a pro shop - Halls to be specific and yes I shoot a Mathews - changed over from Hoyt after many years. I went to the pro shop once again for their expertise and the wide selection available. Even after 32 years a little tune up doesn't hurt.

Good luck and welcome to the bowhunting family!

Well said passinthru63, When I got my bow I went to Halls Arrow and drove them nuts with shooting every bow that they had. I liked my Bear Epic Extreme over the others, even Mathews. So go and shoot as many as possable.

CTtrapper
01-20-2010, 05:02 PM
but that tends to make you not practice as you should, which results in lost animals. Just my .02.



Geee...loose 13 Deer in Sept and I'll never hear the end of it....:icon_winkle:

pb4life1200
01-20-2010, 05:17 PM
Go to Cabelas you can try as many bows as you like, and i personally love bear. Anyone of the bear bows will grab your heart

Homestead
01-20-2010, 06:01 PM
Hate to say it , but the bow you want is the one that feels right and fits you well...It is all personal,we all have our favorites. I prefer PSE, I liked shooting High Country, Browning, Darton and others I have always been a speed freak which does not always mean the easiest to shoot. None of the bow companies can afford to make junk today. The outdoor shows are coming pretty quickly and you can check out a lot of bows there.You will not be able to shoot them, but at least you can handle them. Passinthru is right on the money with his advice. Figure out your budget and feel out the bows in that range, if budget is not a problem buy the best you can afford and stay away from gimmicks, stick with the dependable....You can easily be over $1000.00 just for the bow with sights,rest, stabilizer and so on. Another thing to consider is draw weight, 15 years ago I was shooting 3D matches at 85 lbs just to hit 280 fps.I am only 36 and I can feel the damage to my joints from that kind of poundage. Today's bows are alot more powerful then back then, I use 63 lbs for hunting which is more then enough for any whitetail you will come across. The speed is around 280-295 with a 2314 and broadhead.

What ever you buy It must fit you properly and you must be comfortable with it to shoot well. Bill at Center Sports in Columbia would take good care of you.

StoneCrusher
01-20-2010, 08:19 PM
I think everyone covered it well.
understand your budget-then go another $50 higher.
try several in that price range.

comment on poundage:
- 40 pounds will pass through many broadside deer shots.
- many elk/Bear hunters use 60-65 lbs. Mine is a 2009 Martin Maob @ 65lbs 29.5" draw and chrono @ 268' per/second with broadhead

sharkin
01-20-2010, 08:31 PM
this was my 1st year bow hunting.I went to sportsmann outpost in wolcott and purchased a hoyt alpha max great bow got 3 deer with the bow..THe biggest issue is the amout of money you want to spend..I started at 350 and ended at 850 with all the extras..guys at the shop where great..

CTtrapper
01-20-2010, 10:51 PM
Hey, 3 deer for your first year is pretty damn good, congrats